Publications

Virtue and Law in Plato and Beyond
By Julia Annas
Published by Oxford University Press, 2017

From the publisher:
Julia Annas presents a study of Plato's account of the relation of virtue to law: how it developed from the Republic to the Laws, and how his ideas were taken up by Cicero and by Philo of Alexandria. Annas shows that, rather than rejecting the approach to an ideal society in the Republic (as generally thought), Plato is in both dialogues concerned with the relation of virtue to law, and obedience to law, and presents, in the Laws, a more careful and sophisticated account of that relation. His approach in the Laws differs from his earlier one, because he now tries...

Significance and System: Essays on Kant's Ethics
Significance and System book cover
By Mark Timmons
Published by Oxford University Press, 2017

From the publisher:
Significance and System: Essays on Kant's Ethics brings together central lines of thought in Mark Timmons's work on Kant's moral theory. The first part of the book concerns the interpretation and justification of the categorical imperative in which Timmons argues for a "differential roles" interpretation of the categorical imperative, according to which distinct formulations of this principle play different roles in the overall economy of Kant's ethics. In addition he offers a detailed interpretation of the analytic/synthetic distinction in Kant's ethics...

The Quantum Revolution in Philosophy
By Richard Healey
Published by Oxford University Press, 2017

From the publisher:
Quantum theory launched a revolution in physics. But we have yet to understand the revolution's significance for philosophy. Richard Healey opens a path to such understanding. Most studies of the conceptual foundations of quantum theory first try to interpret the theory - to say how the world could possibly be the way the theory says it is. But, though fundamental, quantum theory is enormously successful without describing the world in its own terms. When properly applied, models of quantum theory offer good advice on the significance and credibility of claims...

Morality, Governance, and Social Institutions: Reflections on Russell Hardin
By Thomas Christiano, Ingrid Creppell, and Jack Knight, eds.
Published by Springer International Publishing, 2017

From the publisher:
This book reflects on the research and career of political theorist Russell Hardin from scholars of Political Science, Philosophy, Sociology, Economics, and Law, among other disciplines. Contributions address core issues of political theory as perceived by Hardin, starting with his insistence that many of the basic institutions of modern society and their formative historical beginnings can be understood as proceeding primarily from the self-interested motives of the participants. Many of the contributions in this volume struggle with the constraints imposed on...

Disputed Moral Issues
By Mark Timmons
Published by Oxford University Press, 2016

Frome the publisher:
Ideal for courses in contemporary moral problems, applied ethics, and introduction to ethics, Disputed Moral Issues: A Reader, Fourth Edition, offers a unique pedagogical approach that bridges moral theory and applied ethics. Bringing together seventy engaging articles, it also includes an accessible Moral Theory Primer (Chapter 1). Each selection is enhanced by a host of pedagogical features, including concise summaries, reader cues referring to pertinent moral theories, and reading and discussion questions. A "Quick Guide to Moral Theories" at the front...

The Tyranny of the Ideal: Justice in a Diverse Society
By Gerald Gaus
Published by Princeton University Press, 2016

From the publisher:
In his provocative new book, The Tyranny of the Ideal, Gerald Gaus lays out a vision for how we should theorize about justice in a diverse society. Gaus shows how free and equal people, faced with intractable struggles and irreconcilable conflicts, might share a common moral life shaped by a just framework. He argues that if we are to take diversity seriously and if moral inquiry is sincere about shaping the world, then the pursuit of idealized and perfect theories of justice—essentially, the entire production of theories of...

Essays on Paradoxes
By Terrence Horgan
Published by Oxford University Press, 2016

From the publisher:
This volume brings together many of Terence Horgan's essays on paradoxes: Newcomb's problem, the Monty Hall problem, the two-envelope paradox, the sorites paradox, and the Sleeping Beauty problem. Newcomb's problem arises because the ordinary concept of practical rationality constitutively includes normative standards that can sometimes come into direct conflict with one another. The Monty Hall problem reveals that sometimes the higher-order fact of one's having reliably received pertinent new first-order information constitutes stronger pertinent new information...

Causation and Free Will
By Carolina Sartorio
Published by Oxford University Press, 2016

From the publisher:
Carolina Sartorio argues that only the actual causes of our behaviour matter to our freedom. Although this simple view of freedom clashes with most theories of responsibility, including the most prominent 'actual sequence' theories currently on offer, Sartorio argues for its truth. The key, she claims, lies in a correct understanding of the role played by causation in a view of that kind. Causation has some important features that make it a responsibility-grounding relation, and this contributes to the success of the view. Also, when agents act freely, the actual...

The Facts in Logical Space: A Tractarian Ontology
By Jason Turner
Published by Oxford University Press, 2016

From the publisher:
Philosophers have long been tempted by the idea that objects and properties are abstractions from the facts. But how is this abstraction supposed to go? If the objects and properties aren't 'already' there, how do the facts give rise to them? Jason Turner develops and defends a novel answer to this question: The facts are arranged in a quasi-geometric 'logical space', and objects and properties arise from different quasi-geometric structures in this space.

Review:
"An excellent piece of analytic metaphysics: the care, precision, detail, and breadth of...

How Physics Makes Us Free
By Jennan Ismael
Published by Oxford University Press, 2016

From the publisher:
In 1687 Isaac Newton ushered in a new scientific era in which laws of nature could be used to predict the movements of matter with almost perfect precision. Newton's physics also posed a profound challenge to our self-understanding, however, for the very same laws that keep airplanes in the air and rivers flowing downhill tell us that it is in principle possible to predict what each of us will do every second of our entire lives, given the early conditions of the universe.

Can it really be that even while you toss and turn late at night in the throes of an...

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